“In the end we will conserve only what we love. We will love only what we understand. We will understand only what we are taught.”

- Baba Dioum

 

A woman named Isabel from the community of yomibato shows us her fish she caught using an ancient fishing technique. The families cultivate a plant known as barbasco, that has an Anesthetic when its toxins are released from its mashed roots into the streams, stunning the fish for an easy grab.     

A woman named Isabel from the community of yomibato shows us her fish she caught using an ancient fishing technique. The families cultivate a plant known as barbasco, that has an Anesthetic when its toxins are released from its mashed roots into the streams, stunning the fish for an easy grab.     

 

The Manú Project documents stories of remote, indigenous Amazonians who are struggling to conserve their cultures behind invisible fences of the heavily regulated Manú National Park.

From Andean grasslands to ghostly cloud forests to the tropical rainforest, Manú encompasses terrestrial and biological diversity like no other place on Earth and is diligently regulated to protect its extraordinary dynamism. However, the park also encompasses an unparalleled cultural diversity that few realize is endangered by the very regulations that protect the environment. By ignoring and silencing the voices of the indigenous people of Manú, outside restrictions are forcing a divide not only between the natives and their spiritual connection to the jungle, but also between families and communities themselves.

Using photojournalism, filmmaking and journalism our expedition teams will travel over 300 miles deep into the Peruvian Amazonian Jungle to capture more than the overlaying beauty of Manú. 

The Manú Project will feature the hidden stories of Peruvian Amazonian natives, struggling to save their culture as Manu Park restrictions pressure them to abandon everything.