Expedition 2016:

 

Lina Collado

University of Puerto Rico/American Intercontinental University, B.F.A.; Columbia University School of Arts, M.F.A. Lina studied Modern Languages at the University of Puerto Rico and spent a semester abroad at the Università degli Studi di Urbino in Urbino, Italy, before earning her B.F.A. in Visual Communications.  Lina earned her M.F.A. in Film with a concentration in Screenwriting/Production at Columbia. Lina has worked as a photographer, environmentalist, and videographer for a marine conservation non-profit on the small island of Culebra, Puerto Rico.  She has published photographs in Puerto Rico’s major newspaper, El Nuevo Dia, and created a documentary film titled “Cities under the Sea,” to increase awareness of coral reef ecosystems and how to conserve them.  In 2012, Lina worked as an assistant production coordinator for two episodes of USA Network’s “White Collar,” filmed in Puerto Rico. Lina currently lives in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where she worked in 2013 for the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival. Lina has been published in Patagonia Winter Catalog, BBC Wildlife Magazine 2013, Exposure 2012/2015 Art Book & Gallery Selections and received a front page publication for JH News & Guide. In the last year, she has also had her first solo exhibition in Jackson and gallery selections exhibited in L'ouvre, Paris. http://www.linacollado.com/

 


BretT Monroe Garner, photo by Ulla Lohmann

Brett Garner

Brett is a biologist, conservation photographer, and educator. He earned an undergraduate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles in marine biology and oceanography, and a master’s degree from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in biodiversity and conservation.

He is an avid traveler and has worked extensively in Asia, Oceania, the Middle East, and throughout the Americas. His work focuses primarily on traditional communities and their relationships with the environment. He likes telling the types of stories that encourage people to experience, enjoy, and care for our natural world. www.brettmonroegarner.com.

 

 


Kevin Floerke

Kevin is an anthropologist, archaeologist, photographer, and educator. He earned an undergraduate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles in anthropology in 2010, and has been working in Peru ever since.

His work has focused on both ancient and modern populations of the Peruvian highland Andes, examining first the Inca Road System and then the relationship of ancient Andean populations with their environment and landscape. He has mounted expeditions into the Vilcabamba cloud forest to study remains of high altitude mountain veneration sites and the surrounding network of Pre-Columbian remains in  the region. His photography and archaeological research are published in the latest edition of The Incas. Both his research and photography focus on the interaction of human beings with their natural and built environment.
 www.kevinfloerke.com


Kyle McBurnie

Kyle is an expedition leader, environmental activist and image-maker.  He earned an undergraduate degree from the University of California, San Diego in behavioral and ecological biology, and has since co-created SD Expeditions - an ocean expedition company based in San Diego focusing on bringing educational ocean experiences to the public.

Kyle’s film work includes working with productions crews from 60 Minutes, Discovery Channel and BBC’s Pole to Pole, and he is a member of the San Diego based production company Pacific Video Production.  Kyle is also an award-winning underwater photographer whose work has been published in National Geographic magazine, Nature’s Best Photography and Scuba Diving magazine.  His work is currently showcased at the Upwelling Fine Art gallery in La Jolla.


Andy Melo_Uncontacted

Andrés Melo

Andy is an independent and commercial filmmaker, photographer, and educator. He received a B.F.A in film with a minor in cultural anthropology from the University of Central Florida, and studied still photography at Hunter College CUNY. 

Andy has worked on media projects throughout the world, shot with brands such as Sony and Facebook, as well as documentaries with topics ranging from the impact of land mines on children in Nicaragua to the documentation of modern Maya culture in Guatemala. He sees this balance key to achieving his passion of connecting cultures through various mediums.


Shelby Johnson

Shelby is a dedicated environmental and cultural activist, underwater enthusiast and educator. She earned her undergraduate degree in education with a minor in creative nonfiction writing and reporting. She has traveled solo around Europe, North and South America and even to the Arctic in pursuit of gathering stories and information on world cultures and environments. Her desire and determination to educate while promoting sustainable economies and conservation efforts stretch from deep beneath the oceans to the tops of mountains and there is no end in sight for this lady. Storytelling is one of her greatest passions and is what fuels her travels. She believes we all have something to learn and something to teach.

 


Rebbeca Wolff

Rebecca Wolff

Rebecca is a researcher, cultural anthropologist and explorer. She has worked in the Andean and Amazonian regions of Peru for the past four years, looking at themes of Indigenous health and the effects of climate change on communities. In 2014 Rebecca was named a National Geographic Young Explorer, receiving funding for a project on how Shawi communities perceive causes of waterborne illness, and relationships with land and water. Her research continues to focus on making healthcare more culturally appropriate for Peruvian and Canadian communities.

Currently Rebecca works in Toronto as a human-centered design consultant. She is looking at how to integrate Indigenous health into medical education, and how Indigenous voices are represented in medical education literature. She is also acting as a Consultant for the Manú Project.


Dante Karín Núñez del Prado Santander

Dante, born in Cusco Peru, has dedicated his life to protect nature. Since 1994, he has worked as a conservationist, environmentalist, and activist for the jungle in Manu National Park. Dante was instrumental in the creation of the nonprofit private reserve, Amaru Mayú Ecological Reserve in the Peruvian Amazon, protecting over 1,000 acres from illegal logging, mining and agriculture. 

Currently, Dante operates as an official guide specialized in the Manu region and continues to sustain the Amaru Mayú project.